ATC

  • Some GA pilots believe that ATC are very busy and that they would be bothering them by talking to them.  In this video produced in partnership with NATCA and the FAA, Air traffic control specialist Sarah Patten debunks the notion that talking to flights squawking 1200 is an inconvenience for ATC.

    Listening comprehension - plain English in an aeronautical context

    Watch the video and then check your comprehension by comparing against the transcript hidden below.

  • Air traffic control specialist Sarah Patten gives practical advice for pilots who are worried ATC will speak too quickly for comprehension.

    Ask ATC is produced in partnership with NATCA and the FAA.

  • Should I bother calling for flight following services if ATC is busy?

  • Flight following and airspace

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  • IFR Practice Approaches

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  • Pilots often assume that all air traffic controllers have weather radar, but that’s not the case. In this Ask ATC segment, air traffic controllers Beverly Cook, Mel Davis, and AnnMarie Taggio share tips for how pilots can better communicate their knowledge of the weather ahead to help ATC find a safe solution.

    To learn more, check out our Radio Communication and ATC safety spotlight at www.airsafetyinstitute.org/spotlight/radiocommandatc.

    The AOPA Air Safety Institute’s Ask ATC video series was made possible by generous donations to the AOPA Foundation by the National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA).

    Please visit the AOPA Foundation at www.aopafoundation.org/donate to learn how you can participate in funding future safety programs by the Air Safety Institute.

    Watch the entire Ask ATC series at http://bit.ly/AskATCplaylist

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  • In this Ask ATC segment, air traffic controllers Leanne Martin and Matt Sullivan clarify the differences between VFR flight plans and flight following services to help pilots fly safely to their destination.

    To learn more, check out our Flight Planning and Preflight safety spotlight at www.airsafetyinstitute.org/spotlight/planningandpreflight.

    The AOPA Air Safety Institute’s Ask ATC video series was made possible by generous donations to the AOPA Foundation by the National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA).

    Please visit the AOPA Foundation at www.aopafoundation.org/donate to learn how you can participate in funding future safety programs by the Air Safety Institute.

    Watch the entire Ask ATC series at http://bit.ly/AskATCplaylist

  • In this Ask ATC segment, air traffic controller Leanne Martin talks about the importance of requesting flight following in advance before taxiing in order to help ATC process your request and provide the services you need in a timely manner.

    To learn more, check out our Radio Communication and ATC safety spotlight at www.airsafetyinstitute.org/spotlight/radiocommandatc.

    The AOPA Air Safety Institute’s Ask ATC video series was made possible by generous donations to the AOPA Foundation by the National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA).

    Please visit the AOPA Foundation at www.aopafoundation.org/donate to learn how you can participate in funding future safety programs by the Air Safety Institute.

    Watch the entire Ask ATC series at http://bit.ly/AskATCplaylist

    Video transcript:
    The best place to communicate with air traffic control your intentions is always on the ground when you’re not moving. That way we can get all of the specific information that we need. Then at that point in time, we as controllers can pass that information on. It does not help controllers for you to tell us information at the last second. When you’re on Ground Control or Clearance Delivery, and you let the controller know what you’d like to do, we write down all that information. That information is passed to the Local Controller. The Local Controller then knows which direction to turn you. From, after you depart, then that information is now passed to the Approach Controller, and the Approach Controller then will know what requested altitude you would like and what direction of flight that you’d like.

  • This incident involves China Eastern unknowingly transmitting blind, (possibly by accidentally keying the mic) and being unable to receive transmissions from TWR.  

    Notice how China Eastern was able to transmit but not receive. In the circumstances above how could TWR identify that the aircraft had a problem and was unable to respond? 

  • What would you do if you are given an instruction by a controller that you are not able to comply with?  Watch the video and listen to the advice.

  • Video from ASI's online course, Say It Right https://www.aopa.org/lms/courses/say-...

  • From ASI's online course, Say It Right https://www.aopa.org/lms/courses/say-...

  • From ASI's online course, Say It Right https://www.aopa.org/lms/courses/say-...

Hong Kong

Aviation English Asia has been offering part time and full time courses in Hong Kong since 2009.

All courses are available in Hong Kong. Check the schedule above for details.

Vietnam

Aviation English Asia has been offering part time courses in Vietnam since 2014.

All courses are available in Vietnam - typically every 8 weeks, or by special arrangement.

Taiwan

ICAO Aviation English, English for Aircraft Maintenance Engineers, Technicians and Mechanics, and English for Flight Attendants are available in Taipei, Tainan and Kaosiung.

Cambodia

Aviation English Asia has been offering part time and full time courses in Cambodia since July 2018

All courses are available in Phnom Penh and Siem Reap. Check the schedule for details.

  

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