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Prepare for your ICAO test, learn aviation theory, hear student experiences and get hints and tips to improve your English.

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callsign Radiotelephony | Learning Zone | Page 3

An aircraft call sign is a group of alphanumeric characters used to identify an aircraft in air-ground communications.

Three

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Pilot controller communication

"When controllers and pilots better

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Automatic terminal information service, or ATIS, is a continuous broadcast of recorded aeronautical information in busier terminal areas, i.e. airports and their immediate

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This incident involves China Eastern unknowingly transmitting blind, (possibly by accidentally keying the mic) and being unable to receive transmissions from TWR.  

Notice how China

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The use of similar call signs by aircraft operating in the same area and especially on the same RTF frequency often causes potential and actual flight safety incidents. This hazard is usually

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Advice about improving your English and passing an ICAO English test from Aviation English Asia.
Article written/adapted by

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Radiotelephony

Headset Radiotelephony | Learning Zone | Page 3

Radiotelephony is an essential part of Aviation English.  If you are a beginner in aviation, you can learn basic radiotelephony with our free course.  Read the articles and then try the exercises.

All learning materials are copyright of Aviation English Asia Ltd.

 

Headset Radiotelephony | Learning Zone | Page 3

Welcome to this free course in basic radiotelephony from Aviation English Asia.

Pronunciation of letters used flight operations is very important.  To avoid confusion, the ICAO phonetic alphabet is used.  This is sometimes known as the NATO phonetic alphabet. The 26 code words in the NATO phonetic alphabet are assigned to the 26 letters of the English alphabet in alphabetical order as follows: Alfa, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo, Foxtrot, Golf, Hotel, India, Juliett, Kilo, Lima, Mike, November, Oscar, Papa, Quebec, Romeo, Sierra, Tango, Uniform, Victor, Whiskey, X-ray, Yankee, Zulu.

Read and memorise all of the ICAO phonetic alphabet.  The stressed syllable is in bold.

You will find it helpful to say the phonic (pronunciation) aloud.  After you have learned them all in sequence, try saying them backwards.

icao phonetic alphabet

Exercise:

  1. Spell your name using the ICAO phonetic alphabet
  2. Look at the pictures of aircraft below.  How would you pronounce their tail numbers?

250px-Vans.rv-7.g-kels.arp Radiotelephony | Learning Zone | Page 3 220px-JAL_B747-400JA8089_5481514185 Radiotelephony | Learning Zone | Page 3   US_Registration_Closeup Radiotelephony | Learning Zone | Page 3  Qantas_Aircraft_flight449 Radiotelephony | Learning Zone | Page 3

When you are confident using the ICAO phonetic alphabet, start the next lesson, which is about the pronunciation of numbers in aviation.

For more interesting articles to help you improve your Aviation English please visit http://aviationenglish.com and LIKE our Facebook Page

Headset Radiotelephony | Learning Zone | Page 3

Pronunciation of numbers used flight operations is very important.  To avoid confusion, the ICAO phonetic numbers are used.  Numbers are particularly important for flight levels, headings, speeds, fuel quantities and weather information.  

NOTE: Sometimes Flight Levels are used to express altitudes, e.g. 33,000 is Flight Level 330.  Due to international differences some countries use different Flight Level Notation.  For example in the US Flight Levels start at 18,000 feet.

Read and memorise all of the ICAO phonetic numbers.  To increase intelligibility it is good to say them slowly and clearly.

NUMBER   PRONUNCIATION

0  Zero     Ze ro

1 One       Wun

2 Two       Too

3 Three     Tree

4 Four       Fow er

5 Five        Fife

6 Six         Six

7 Seven     Sev en

8 Eight      Ate

9 Nine       Nin er

10 Ten      Ten

Hundred    Hundred

Thousand  Tau sand

Exercise:

  1. Spell your phone number using the ICAO phonetic alphabet.
  2. Look at the flight levels below.  How would you pronounce them?
  3. Try the exercise again, but this time pretend to be a controller and say "climb and maintain" before each altitude.

4200

9000  

12500

16000

27000

33000   

 

When you are confident using the ICAO number system, start the next lesson, which is about listening to ATIS.

 

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Radiotelephony 101 course materials

9780117929067 Radiotelephony | Learning Zone | Page 3

PANS-ATM Radiotelephony | Learning Zone | Page 3

airspeak Radiotelephony | Learning Zone | Page 3

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matf Radiotelephony | Learning Zone | Page 3

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